Acute Care in Your Own Home

Imagine receiving hospital treatment without even staying in hospital. In the last two years, that’s what 1,700 NHS patients have experienced under a ground-breaking acute hospital-at-home scheme run by ORLA Healthcare. So how does it work and can it really help solve the crisis facing the health service? They read like a list of potentially […]

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Alleviating PONV with Acupuncture

The remit of an Acute Pain Service is to relieve post-operative pain after surgery and trauma (Royal College of Surgeons, 1990). Post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV) is one of surgery’s most distressing outcomes and can incur major physical and psychological suffering. Unfortunately, pharmaceutical management of PONV is not always successful, leaving patients distressed and health-care […]

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Taking Over the World

Passion, belief… and a desire to take over the world. Tracy Earley, nurse consultant for the Integrated Nutrition and Communication Teams based in Preston, describes what it takes to make a rapid access seven-day a week clinic a success. Tracy Earley sets her sights high. And while world domination might not be her actual goal […]

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Home is Where the (Failing) Heart is

As the population ages, more people will be living with heart failure. So could a pilot project in Rotherham be the key to keeping these patients at home, rather than in hospital? Britain’s population is ageing. On paper, that sounds like medical progress. But the harsh reality is many people who live longer than their predecessors […]

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You spend at least one day a week working with dyslexic entrepreneurs

Jan Halfpenny, a dyslexia and business specialist, shares her thoughts on the value of taking dyslexic differences in entrepreneurs into account. Cass Business School found that one in every five entrepreneurs in the UK is dyslexic and as many as one in every three in the US may have this different way of thinking. These rates […]

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The Freedom of Innovation

It might not be the obvious place to look. But the basements of medical technology firms could be packed with great ideas for the future. And in true entrepreneurial spirit, it’s time to let everyone have a good old rummage, says CME Medical Chairman & Head of Innovation Stephen Thorpe. Stephen Thorpe has been spearheading […]

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The State of Obstetric Anaesthesiology

With 20 years’ experience in obstetric anaesthesia behind him, consultant anaesthetist Dr Roshan Fernando from University College Hospital London (UCLH) has seen many changes – mostly for the better. Here, he talks to Pat Hogan about progress in pain relief for mothers, on-going staffing challenges and the fact that he’s busier than ever. During Dr […]

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Controlled Pain, Speedy Recovery

Post-operative pain can be managed effectively using intravenous infusion. Surgery of any kind can be a daunting prospect. But in reality what most people fear most is not the procedure itself – since they are almost always under a general anaesthetic– but the pain that they expect will follow. Post-operative pain may vary from one […]

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Dying – a Human Experience

Palliative care may lack the glamour of some other areas of medicine. But in terms of importance, it’s rapidly gaining ground, says Professor Sheila Payne, Co-director of the International Observatory for End of Life Care. By Pat Hogan. Stories about the NHS usually begin with how it lags behind health services in other countries and […]

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Gutless Kayaking

Justin Hansen relies on TPN to survive. But that doesn’t stop him achieving great things, both physically and mentally. In October 2013, Justin Hansen and some close friends kayaked more than 400 miles in just 32 days – from the north-east of England to the south-west. It would have been a fantastic achievement for any […]

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